Everything, Everything

One of my 9th graders and a great review of this book. Give her a shout out if you know it!

Another Blooming Flower

Book: Everything, Everything
Author: Nicola Yoon
Genre: Realistic Fiction
Pages: 306


“My disease is as rare as it is famous. Basically, I’m allergic to the world. I don’t leave my house, have not left my house in seventeen years. The only people I ever see are my mom and my nurse, Carla.
But then one day, a moving truck arrives next door. I look out my window, and I see him. He’s tall, lean, and wearing all black—black T-shirt, black jeans, black sneakers, and a black knit cap that covers his hair completely. He catches me looking and stares at me. I stare right back. His name is Olly.
Maybe we can’t predict the future, but we can predict some things. For example, I, Maddy, am certainly going to fall in love with Olly. It’s almost certainly going to be a disaster.”

The main character of the book is Madeline…

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Why Design: Reading and Writing the World.

 

 

I was/am an English major.

The confusion in verb tense stems from a shift in how I act within the world. For years I buried my head in books. Fictional worlds allowed me to explore a myriad of human experiences I would never have had the chance to understand outside the covers of books. I spent years in college honing my skills at reading these worlds, divining the author’s deeper motives (if such is even possible) and understanding the intentionality at the heart of writing.


Head over to www.plusus.org/our-thoughts/ to read the rest.

Ambition, Discovery: Writing, and Teaching, and Learning

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I’ve recently read more than my share of blog posts and articles on “Writing as Discovery.”  The sense is not new, of course, but the renewed (if that’s what it is) interest in writing towards these ends is refreshing.

As a teacher for almost 25 years, and an attendant at numerous conferences or workshops at Bard College’s Institute for Writing and Thinking, my pedagogical quiver contains scores of methods for engaging students in writing to learn or writing as discovery.  This is informal writing, and primary among the methods I use is freewriting as a means for writing to think, and writing to learn.  It’s all about writing as discovery and the methods all rely on a mindset of “just getting it down.”

I’ve read Paul Thomas’s post about the dangers of “writing recipes,” and I appreciate the description of his process.  I suppose one thing to admit if we’re going to dive into writing and discovery with our students is that we as teachers must also be writers and see ourselves in that light. Further, we need to immerse ourselves in the scholarship surrounding creativity and creative production.  Doing so will give us a familiarity with the creative act (and writing of all types is, certainly, creative) and, more important, the vocabulary with which to discuss the act.

My goal as a teacher is not to create writers.  By the time students get to me they have enough facility with language for me to call them writers (ie., people capable of writing).  But if I’m going to get them to see themselves as more than writers in a utilitarian sense, if I want them to believe they can use writing to affect deep thought and emotion in their audience, then I have to teach them how to think in “writerly ways.” (With this term I’m riffing off of Nigel Cross’s work in the UK and his promotion of Design as a discipline for study and the creation of “designerly minded” learners.)   That is, I have to help them develop the mindset and questioning techniques of writers.  Any teacher who seeks to accomplish such must see herself as a writer in that sense as well.  In that, she must be one of the “teachers of ambition” (a great article from Ed Week 2004  https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2004/09/08/02banner.h24.html) who not only “teach English” but who live the lives of writers:  watching, observing, and questioning the world in intensely curious ways…in  manners similar to scientists, but who report on their findings in ways utterly different than scientists.  (Though seriously, it’s freakishly frightening that our theories of the end of the universe are that it will expand into a cold, whimpering “emptiness” and T.S. Eliot writes more or less the same (“This is the way the world ends/Not with a bang but a whimper”).

So if it’s teaching writing as discovery, then I’m making sure I’m constantly doing PD (BARD!!!!!) in writing pedagogy. I’m reading books like Writing Down the Bones, Bird by Bird, Zen in the Art of Writing (a personal favorite by Ray Bradbury); any books on writing Pedagogy like Peter Elbow’s Writing with Power, Writing without Teachers, A Community of Writers; books on the creative process like A Whack on the Side of the Head, A Kick in the Seat of the Pants (both by Roger von Oech), Thinkertoys, Five Star Mind, A Whole New Mind, and countless others.  And, of course, countless articles, etc.

To my teacher friends, perhaps it isn’t all that helpful, to say, go read all these things, go shift your weltanschauung.  But seriously, regardless of what you teach, if you’re not intensely curious about it, then you ought not teach it.  And students know this.  They know that the best teachers of a subject, the ones who go beyond the content and who craft a compelling story about why living a life that reads and writes the world through a mindset of science, math, words, etc…those are the teachers who transfer the sparks of passion, who offer learning as a gift and not a mere duty.  And that gift grows in the student, for they begin to discover their world expanding through mathematical patterns, scientific processes, musical harmonies, or words…”mere words.”

But maybe the best way to teach writing as discovery is to just share our own writing with students, to show them where we discovered things and how that happened.  To turn the classroom into a congregation worshiping at the miracle of creation, whatever form that creation may take.  For me, it is words, and not merely their consumption through reading books.  My classroom is a place to marvel at the utterly unique pairings, juxtapositions, and random wonders of words in all the varied forms and structures we have created.  It is a place to linger over those forms and structures, and to revel in the joy of new forms of expression we discover along the way towards a better understanding of who we are as human beings.

Advice to a Young Writer(?)

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Quotefancy-2806954-3840x2160We set writing goals for the semester and year in my classroom.  Many students set a goal of “organization” or “focus.”  These are natural goals for any writer, but what I often find is that they are masks for “I want to write more efficiently.  I want to write right the first time.”  Here is one such goal, and my response to it.

I am not the only English teacher in the world, in all of time, who has sought to counsel such students, but this is my student, and this is my response…with strong thanks to my mentors:  Mark R., my 11th grade American Lit. Teacher who introduced me to Freewriting and gave me his copy of Peter Elbow’s Writing with Power; Bard College’s “Institute for Writing and Thinking” where I have grown more as a writer and teacher of writing than any place else; and to Mr. Peter Elbow himself, in whom I’ve found a mentor and kindred spirit.

“My goal for the marking period is to organize my writing better. I need to focus on putting my thoughts out in a clear format that makes sense and is in order. This means leaving out pointless information and recognizing the sequence that the paragraphs should be in. I’m really interested in working on creative writing or writing  poetry, and it would help if I was able to write in a succinct manner in my writing without having to redo entire sections. I can recognize a lot of mistakes in writing, but the sequence of ideas is not one. My thoughts are sporadic, so are my ideas in writing. So my goal is to try and organize my thoughts in my writing so that a can write something that makes sense.”  –E….

E…,

I admire this goal as it seeks to discover a means for writing that is “easier.”  I’ll reply with a quotation attributed to, among others, Ernest Hemingway, one of our great writers of the 20th century:  “It is easy to write. Just sit in front of your typewriter and bleed.”

If you want to get things done and just be done with them and not worry about the quality of your thoughts or the craft of your words, then writing is easier than bleeding.  Organizationally the trick is to come up with some key ideas (Claims you want to make) organize them around a central thesis, and organize their order from least important to greatest, or from closest to most distant, (or vice versa, depending upon the topic), or order them from self, to community, to world.  Or from oldest to newest.  There are even more ways…but those are the key ones.  See, it’s easy, just like I said.  😉  But remember, that doesn’t take the measure of the quality of your ideas or the quality of your writing.

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The hard truth, however, is that nothing great was ever written with ease.  It is always a struggle, or perhaps a learning to dance with our selves and who takes the lead.  Perhaps that’s cold comfort to you and your goal, but the upshot is this:  to get better at writing, you must write, and not for a grade, but you must write for yourself, to please yourself.  If your writing is boring to you it will be so to the reader.  To do this well, you must find your voice.  To find your voice, you must write.  And so you’ve circled back. But none of this is unfamiliar to any artist.  And writing is an art–you must find your own way through it.  Here is one way to conceive of the act….

Peter Elbow breaks the writing process into two parts, “Growing” and “Cooking.”  One does not grow ideas and concepts in direct and linear ways, in ways that are totally organized as they leave the pen.  It is an organic process, like the growth of a vine of peas.  It wanders, meanders, finds new pathways…but it is always rooted in one place to begin…though it may find new roots elsewhere.  Only when that growth has been given time and distance can it bear the fruits of our labors which we then take and “cook” under the heat of editing, organization, and pruning back all our wandering meandering ideas.  This will allow us to strengthen our original idea (the vine) and promote more growth.

That’s a lot to get, but it’s important to understand writing, at least in my class, as a craft, not a science.  I’m teaching to write for learning, not write to demonstrate learning.  In AP Human or AP Gov/Euro you’ll write a lot…but most of that is artless writing to demonstrate learning or simply to rehearse ideas and cement learning (as writing is a good way to do that).  That’s not what I’m about in this class, though I will teach you simplistic ways to go about it.

Right now you simply need to spend the time upfront to develop and grow you ideas, find your center(s) of gravity(ies) and then work toward pruning and edting and reorganizing.  

If beauty is not skin deep, then beautiful writing is also not superficial.  

 In the end, I will urge you to follow this goal you’ve set, but only with the understanding that growing ideas is painstaking, heartbreaking, joyous, amazing, time-consuming work that requires a full-bodied attention to the world and the works around you.  It is hard, but good, honest, rewarding work.  All humans deserve to devote the time and effort to these rewards.

Such I will grant you in this class.

It’s Time We Hold Accountability Accountable

The insight and understanding here should keep you coming back. Gradelessness isn’t about disruption so much as it’s a massive course correction in a more humane direction.

Teachers Going Gradeless

The maxim “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it” (oftenmisattributed to Peter Drucker) sums up the continued belief in the necessity and power of accountability. A lack of accountability is seen as a sure path to lawlessness, indolence, and corruption. We don’t trust people who are unwilling, unprepared, or otherwise unable to render an account.

As a high school language arts teacher who is increasingly “going gradeless” in his teaching practice, I find that I am often left with few “measures” of student learning and growth. In its place, we have a lot of feedback — mostly verbal — and not the kind that fits easily (or at all, really) within the neat grids of a traditional gradebook. Although I still give the occasional quiz (always with the option to retake), this approach has largely disrupted the traditional economy of completing assignments in exchange for points. Since I…

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